The glenohumeral joint’s remarkable stability is maintained by numerous anatomic restraints, including the bony articulation and an elaborate array of dynamic and static soft tissue mechanisms. Despite these restraints, the shoulder’s extensive range of motion and shallow socket make it prone to subluxation and dislocation injuries. Of the anterior restraints
of the shoulder joint, the labrum and capsule are traditionally injured (Bankart tear). An increasingly recognized problem is injury to the bony portion of the glenoid (bony Bankart). Osseous injury to the glenoid is one of the most important factors in the successful management of recurrent shoulder instability. Proper early recognition of glenoid bone injury in the setting of recurrent instability improves nonoperative and operative decision making, particularly in the athletic patient.

Full Article: The Importance of the Recognition and Treatment of Glenoid Bone Loss in an Athletic Population